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G. John Cole

Digital nomad & freelance writer.

How Can Universities Promote Internationalization?

[…]Those universities that work proactively in developing and sustaining international recruitment, networks, and strategies can expect their students to be more highly valued by multinational employers, who value a broadness of experience and intercultural awareness. Along with the teaching, research, and service staff, they will enjoy the opportunity to connect with talented students and faculty from peer universities around the world, and to make a contribution that is likely to be recognized on an international scale. This is what we call Internationalization: how can we make it work in today’s market?


Read the full article at Keystone Academic Solutions.

Apple iCar Designs Capture Apple’s Journey From the 80s

Computing giants Apple are known for their iconic and forward-looking product design, so it was a big disappointment for motorists and dreamers alike when, late last year, the plug was pulled on their plans to develop an Apple car.

It’s a massive loss for those of us who fancy the latest Apple designs, but a great opportunity to imagine what might have been – so that’s just what the people over at Click Mechanic have done, creating five imaginary Apple car designs inspired by classic Mac hardware from the past thirty years. Think of it as the Batmobile meets desktop computing.


Continue reading at Automoblog.

9 Surefire Ways to Make Your Customers Happy

There is an oft-told legend about how Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos likes to make sure there is an empty chair at every company meeting: the chair represents the customers, so the most important ‘person’ is always ‘in the room.’ It’s the kind of visual stunt that sets apart great leaders from good ones, and also makes for a nice anecdote if you plan on being the sort of person that has biographies written about them!


Continue reading at SmallBizClub.

How to make yourself work when you’re not feeling it

Being boss doesn’t mean you get to demand results – it means creating the conditions for those results to be achieved. If you’re running your own business and are responsible for a team, you’ve probably cast a judgmental eye over some of the trendy quirks and gimmicks that your contemporaries in some of the better-known start-ups have applied to their workspaces. Yet, these environments became famous because the businesses are successful. The management at Google, Vimeo et al. recognize that staff motivation is a complex beast. No matter how devoted your employees might be, there are certain mental and physical limits that affect us all.


Continue reading on Tom Spencer.

10 Steps To a Promotion (Without Working Longer)

Working long, thankless hours is bad for the soul – and it may not be doing your career any good, either. If you’re looking to rise within your organization, you will be heartened to hear that getting a promotion is no longer a case of out-working your “rivals.” Rather, relationships and meaningful engagement with the business are far more important.


Continue reading at Classy Career Girl.

How to Feel like you’re Traveling even when you’re Not

Miksang is the Tibetan word for “clear eye,” and it is this attitude of openness and non-judgment that can allow a mindful photographer to discover, express and share astonishing images in the world around them. Rather than capturing an unrepeatable moment or a polished composition, it is about becoming aware of the shape, texture and color of the world around us.

Miksang photography cannot be reduced to set of stylistic rules, although you may sense an intangible thread running between the truly successful Miksang pictures that you take or observe. Rather, Miksang is about the suppression of thought in favor of pure perception. The mind, unencumbered by political or strictly aesthetic ideas, is freed to sense the presence of the scene as it presents itself as an image.


Read the whole piece at Elephant Journal.

The best Japanese movies of the past half-century

The Japanese film industry formed a strange landscape in the sixties, with often highly-constrained studio filmmakers churning out pulpish B-movies, flanked by an independent scene that grew out from the Japanese New Wave, and highly experimental narrative films from directors better known as visual artists.

Japanese society was evolving at a rapid rate following the fall of the Empire and greater cultural communication with the west. But if London was swinging and the hippies were challenging conventional morality in the States, cultural taboos were tougher to shake in Japan.

Cinema audiences could, however, live out their frustrations vicariously at the movies, where despite tight censorship laws the nation’s progressive filmmakers were pushing the envelope in their expression of love, lust, and all the weirdness in between.


My history of Japanese cinema for Itcher takes 5 movies from every half-decade since 1960, and explores some of the overlapping themes and styles employed by the nation’s greatest filmmakers:

1960-65 1965-70 1970-75 1975-80 1980-85 1985-90 1990-95 1995-2000 2000-05 2005-10 2010-15

How to live a happy life according to science

At this time of year, it is important to make sure you take steps to keep your mood buoyant. Regardless of your general attitude toward work, your body and brain have their own ways of responding to the cold and the dark. Thankfully, there are plenty of researchers who are keen to figure out ways we can counter this gloom.


Continue reading at Happy Melly.

50 Wilderness Backpacking Tips You Need To Know

You learn some pretty tough lessons in the wilderness, and that’s partly what backpacking is about – going beyond your safety zone and discovering something about yourself, your comrades and nature. But while you will inevitably become a more wizened traveller with every expedition, there will never be a time to turn your nose up at a well-meant tip. If you’re new to the game, you’ll certainly want to stock up on a little hand-me-down expertise before making your first big excursion.


Continue reading at The Outbound.

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